Cybernetic Serendipity (1968)  http://33.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lnu1vk6hPw1qmskiio1_1280.jpg

exhibition view, ICA London Rowland Emett’s The Honeywell-Emett Forget-me-not Computer [View related British Pathe newsreels 1 &

Cybernetic Serendipity Exhibition poster, Institute of Contemporary Art, 2 August – 20 October, 1968 © Cybernetic Serendipity

Curator Paul Pieroni and artist Yuri Pattison discuss the contemporary resonance of the landmark 1968 exhibition Cybernetic Legacy with its curator, Jasia Reichardt.

Atelier Cyberspace, Sensory Space, Charlottenborg, Copenhagen 1970. Susanne Ussing and Carsten Hoff created a series of full-scale Sensory Spaces over the course of two years. The idea was to create interventions that had a physically affective impact and served to dissolve space. They were also intended to offer an experience of organic interconnectedness between the body and the world.

Who invented cyberspace? More than a decade before William Gibson defined the concept as a digital hallucination, two Danish artists formulated a vision about cyberspace without the use of computers.

Gordon Pask, The Colloquy of Mobiles, 1968. Cybernetic Serendipity, ICA, London 1968.

Gordon Pask, The Colloquy of Mobiles, Cybernetic Serendipity, ICA, London

Poster for Sensory Space at Nikolaj Church 1969. Print on plastic, wool, Atelier Cyberspace (Susanne Ussing and Carsten Hoff).

Poster for Sensory Space at Nikolaj Church Print on plastic, wool, Atelier Cyberspace (Susanne Ussing and Carsten Hoff).

Susanne Ussing, Cyberspace, 1968–70, collages, dry transfers and photolithography.

Susanne Ussing, Cyberspace, collages, dry transfers and photolithography.

Susanne Ussing, Cyberspace, 1968–70, collages, dry transfers and photolithography.

Susanne Ussing, Cyberspace, collages, dry transfers and photolithography.

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