Sainte Mere Eglise - Normandy Battlefield Tours

Battle sites of Normandy - Sainte Mere Eglise, American paratroopers of the Airborne Division erroneously parachuted into the town square.

American soldiers at St. Mere-Eglise, 1944.

II Guerra Mundial on

On the second day of Operation Overlord, American GIs were found toasting each other with liberated wine. They had reason to celebrate: They had just located a German sniper during their advance into Saint Mere-Eglise.

Window in a church in Ste-Mere-Eglise, Normandy, France, showing the paratroopers who liberated the town on D-Day

stained glass window in the church at St. Mere Eglise, France, the first town to be liberated on DDay. They replaced the stained glass window to include the Allied paratroopers who liberated them.

US paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division relaxing after liberating the village of Sainte-Mere-Eglise in Normandy, during World War II, 8th June 1944. Pin by Paolo Marzioli

US paratroopers of the Airborne Division relaxing after liberating the village of Sainte-Mere-Eglise in Normandy, during World War II, June Pin by old Paolo Poop Stain Marzioli

St. Mere Eglise- John Steele hanging from the steeple. The Paratroopers museum across the street is amazing too.

Mere Eglise, France - 2 paratroopers landing on the church. The F Company landed in the area and some in the town center where they were killed by the Germans.

Blanket covered body of a US paratrooper killed in action near Ste Mere-Eglise in the days following the Allied invasion of Normandy, aka D-Day. June 7, . 1944. Photographer: Bob Landry

Blanket covered body of a US paratrooper killed in by marinamaral on DeviantArt

June 1944, the American soldiers in France, the caption said Ste Mere Eglise, Normandy.

June the American Airborne soldiers in France, the caption said Ste Mere Eglise, Normandy.

On the second day of the Normandy invasion, a wounded German sniper was found lying on a stretcher while American troops advanced into Ste. Mere-Eglise, France.

a wounded German sniper lying on a stretcher as American troops advance into Sainte-Mère-Eglise.

US Army engineers set up lines of communication on the main roads of Ste Mere-Eglise, NORMANDIA, 1944

US Army engineers set up lines of communication on the main roads of Ste Mere-Eglise, NORMANDIA, 1944

The French town of Sainte-Mere-Englise Is a Living D-Day Memorial. It was the first village in Normandy to be liberated by the Americans. An effigy of Private John M Steele who landed on the church tower.on D-Day, 6th June 1944. He was made famous in the film, The Longest Day

French Town Is a Living D-Day Memorial

With the Musée Airborne and other sites, Ste.-Mère-Église, a small town in Normandy, continues its reverence for a World War II battle.

Ste Mere Eglise

Normandy 1944 - This is the main square in Sainte Mère Eglise

This is the exterior of the village church of Ste Mere Eglise. This is one of the locations where the first US troops dropped into Normandy the night before D-day. They still have a simulation of the American Soldier that landed on the church and was stuck there while the village was still occupied by the Germans . You can see the parachute on the right side of the clock tower.

Stained Glass Window: Ste Mere Eglise This is one of my favorite stained glass window.

"Ste-Mere-Eglise" Tom Freeman Print - C-47 at Normandy, D-Day June 6th 1944 #Realism

"Ste-Mere-Eglise" Tom Freeman Print - C-47 at Normandy, D-Day June 6th 1944

"Ste-Mere-Eglise" Tom Freeman Artist Proof - at Normandy, D-Day 1944

merican infantry soldiers resting near camouflaged and disguised tanks before attack on Sainte-Mère-Eglise, june 7, 1944. Photographer: Bob Landry

American infantry soldiers resting near camouflaged and disguised tanks before attack on Sainte-Mère-Eglise, June Photographer: Bob Landry. Pin by Paolo Marzioli

7.12.1944 - Ste. Mere-Eglise, France: Brigadier General Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. (eldest son of President Theodore Roosevelt) seen hours before he died of a coronary thrombosis. The 4th Infantry Division commander described him as “the most gallant soldier and finest gentleman I have ever known.”

Brigadier-General Roosevelt, 57 years old at the time of the invasion, landed with the first wave of American troops at Utah Beach.

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