Jean-Louis Panigel

Jean-Louis Panigel

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Marcel Proust via André Vincens' "Proust, ses personnages: A la recherche du temps perdu"

Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel PROUST was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel À la recherche du temps perdu, published in seven parts between 1913 and

Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust  10 July 1871 – 18 November 1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time; earlier translated as Remembrance of Things Past). It was published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927.

About Marcel Proust: French novelist, best known for his 3000 page masterpiece À la recherche du temps perdu (Remembrance of Things Past or In Search of .

Proust, Marcel PHOTOGRAPHIE ORIGINALE (14,2 X 10,2 CM). PARIS, OTTO, S.D. [1895], SOUS CHEMISE DEMI-MAROQUIN MODERNE.

Proust, Marcel PHOTOGRAPHIE ORIGINALE (14,2 X 10,2 CM). PARIS, OTTO, S.D. [1895], SOUS CHEMISE DEMI-MAROQUIN MODERNE.

Metal Ocarinas?

The Ocarina Network

The Kimono Gallery : Photo

thekimonogallery: “ Informal portrait of woman seated beside koto. Hand-colored photo, about Japan. Image via ookami_dou of Flicker ”

The komusō (literally “priest of nothingness” or “monk of emptiness”) were a group of Zen Buddhist mendicant monks who wandered the roads of Edo period Japan. They would play elaborate tunes on their bamboo flutes as they begged for alms, their faces (and thus, their ego) completely concealed by a distinctive hood woven from straws or reeds. Unsurprisingly, many were recruited as spies or were actually ninja or ronin in disguise, and eventually their temples and their schools were abolished…

occultbleed: “ The komusō (literally “priest of nothingness” or “monk of emptiness”) were a group of Zen Buddhist mendicant monks who wandered the roads of Edo period Japan. They would play elaborate.

A komusō was a Japanese mendicant monk of the Fuke school of Zen Buddhism, during the Edo period of 1600-1868. Komusō were characterised by the straw basket (a sedge or reed hood named a tengai) worn on the head, manifesting the absence of specific ego. They are also known for playing solo pieces on the shakuhachi.

Zen Buddhist mendicant monks who play bamboo flutes and don straw baskets to manifest the absence of a specific ego They play "honkyoku" - original pieces as a method to attain enlightenment and also for healing Called Komuso (via Genesis Giocada)

Plexiglass flute (Moennig, 1937)

Flute essays Posted by The Flute View on Nov 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, November 2017