Sculpture Reproductions Collection

The Sculpture Reproductions Collection of the Rodin Museum Store: http://boutique.musee-rodin.fr/en/
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"The events of my life would fill more than a novel. It would take an epic, the Iliad and the Odyssey, and a Homer to tell my story "I won't recount it today, I don't want to sadden you. I have fallen into an abyss. I live in a world so curious, so strange.  Of the dream that was my life, this is the nightmare." Statue, Art, Museums, Camille Claudel, Rodin Museum, Rodin, Reproduction, Petite, Museum
The Little Chatelaine
"The events of my life would fill more than a novel. It would take an epic, the Iliad and the Odyssey, and a Homer to tell my story "I won't recount it today, I don't want to sadden you. I have fallen into an abyss. I live in a world so curious, so strange. Of the dream that was my life, this is the nightmare."
The Waltz, developed in 1889-90, but not shown at the Salon until 1893, was a pretext for experimenting with different materials. The stoneware version with flambé glaze is an example of her investigations into colour and texture that border on art nouveau. In a letter to the Minister of Fine Arts, dated 8 February 1890, Claudel emphasized that the group had been "considered very good by several artists, in particular Monsieur Rodin". Art Nouveau, Auguste Rodin, Robert Doisneau, Louise Bourgeois, Rodin Museum Paris, French Artists
The Waltz
The Waltz, developed in 1889-90, but not shown at the Salon until 1893, was a pretext for experimenting with different materials. The stoneware version with flambé glaze is an example of her investigations into colour and texture that border on art nouveau. In a letter to the Minister of Fine Arts, dated 8 February 1890, Claudel emphasized that the group had been "considered very good by several artists, in particular Monsieur Rodin".
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  For Rodin hands have both an expressive and a symbolic value: they embody the gesture. Separated from the body, they become studies or mass-produced "offal" and occasionally acquire monumental value. Paris, Sculptures, Sylvia Plath, Pie, Rodin Sculpture
Two Hands
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) For Rodin hands have both an expressive and a symbolic value: they embody the gesture. Separated from the body, they become studies or mass-produced "offal" and occasionally acquire monumental value.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  As Judith Cladel, the friend and biographer of Rodin, suggested, this torso is probably a study for the caryatids Rodin made in 1878 at the Villa Neptune, on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice. But it is only towards 1889, in the final version of the lintel of the Gates of Hell, that it appears, with a right arm and both legs. This torso of Adèle - the name of the presumed model - subsequently became an autonomous figure. Nice, Judith, Gates Of Hell
Torso of Adèle
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) As Judith Cladel, the friend and biographer of Rodin, suggested, this torso is probably a study for the caryatids Rodin made in 1878 at the Villa Neptune, on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice. But it is only towards 1889, in the final version of the lintel of the Gates of Hell, that it appears, with a right arm and both legs. This torso of Adèle - the name of the presumed model - subsequently became an autonomous figure.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  Starting with The Shades, an assemblage of three identical figures placed at the top of The Gates of Hell before 1886, fragmentation and multiplication guided Auguste Rodin in his search for new rhythms. The Secret
Study for the Secret
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) Starting with The Shades, an assemblage of three identical figures placed at the top of The Gates of Hell before 1886, fragmentation and multiplication guided Auguste Rodin in his search for new rhythms.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  For Rodin, the female body was an inexhaustible source of inspiration throughout his life as an artist, so much so that it is difficult to date this small torso which resembles an antique sculpture through its firm volumes. Antiques, Painting & Drawing, Female Bodies, Female Torso
Small Female Torso
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) For Rodin, the female body was an inexhaustible source of inspiration throughout his life as an artist, so much so that it is difficult to date this small torso which resembles an antique sculpture through its firm volumes.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  Rodin used his existing works in a thousand ways: by breaking them up, re-grouping them, reworking in various materials and also by changing the scale - enlarging or reducing ? which completely changes how the sculpture is expressed and its impact on the viewer. Portrait, Pierre
Head of Pierre de Wissant
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) Rodin used his existing works in a thousand ways: by breaking them up, re-grouping them, reworking in various materials and also by changing the scale - enlarging or reducing ? which completely changes how the sculpture is expressed and its impact on the viewer.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  This small figurine, huddled up on itself and ready to leap up in a burst of energy, represents the dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950).  Rodin was very interested in the different forms of contemporary dance, as practised, for example, by Loïe Fuller, Isadora Duncan, Nijinsky, or other performers of the French Cancan, as well as in Cambodian dancers. He found in this ephemeral art an opportunity to capture and fix the most fleeting movement. Rodin Drawing
Nijinsky
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) This small figurine, huddled up on itself and ready to leap up in a burst of energy, represents the dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950). Rodin was very interested in the different forms of contemporary dance, as practised, for example, by Loïe Fuller, Isadora Duncan, Nijinsky, or other performers of the French Cancan, as well as in Cambodian dancers. He found in this ephemeral art an opportunity to capture and fix the most fleeting movement.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  Mercury, known to the Greeks as Hermes, was Jupiter's son. Among his many functions, he was charged with conducting the souls of the dead to the Underworld and being the messenger of the gods. Rodin preferred this dramatic aspect of his character. Hermès, Mercury, Underworld
Mercury
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) Mercury, known to the Greeks as Hermes, was Jupiter's son. Among his many functions, he was charged with conducting the souls of the dead to the Underworld and being the messenger of the gods. Rodin preferred this dramatic aspect of his character.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  The origin of Iris can be traced to the enlargement of a study for the allegorical figure intended to crown the second project for the Monument to Victor Hugo (1897), in which the poet is portrayed standing, with the figure placed in a plunging position. It was then completed by a stretched right arm, a head and a pair of wings. Iris, Monument, Musée D'orsay
Iris, Messenger of the Gods
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) The origin of Iris can be traced to the enlargement of a study for the allegorical figure intended to crown the second project for the Monument to Victor Hugo (1897), in which the poet is portrayed standing, with the figure placed in a plunging position. It was then completed by a stretched right arm, a head and a pair of wings.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  Helene von Hindenburg, who married Alfred von Nostitz-Wallwitz in 1904, was introduced to Rodin by Count Harry Kessler, a German diplomat and man of letters. She had just seen the exhibition in the Pavillon de l'Alma (1900) and was fascinated by the sculptor's art. Portraits, Artist, Sitter, Exhibition
Hélène von Nostitz
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) Helene von Hindenburg, who married Alfred von Nostitz-Wallwitz in 1904, was introduced to Rodin by Count Harry Kessler, a German diplomat and man of letters. She had just seen the exhibition in the Pavillon de l'Alma (1900) and was fascinated by the sculptor's art.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)   In 1900, the critic Gustave Kahn wrote, "Rodin is the sculptor of hands, raging, tensed, arched, damned hands". There is no doubt that Rodin attached more importance to this part of the body than any other. Fascinated by the expressive power of isolated hands, he studied them unceasingly, accumulating in his studio numerous studies in clay or plaster, in which the sensitivity of the modelling vies with the verisimilitude of the gesture. Sculptures Artistiques, Sculpture Art, French Sculptor
Hand of a Pianist
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) In 1900, the critic Gustave Kahn wrote, "Rodin is the sculptor of hands, raging, tensed, arched, damned hands". There is no doubt that Rodin attached more importance to this part of the body than any other. Fascinated by the expressive power of isolated hands, he studied them unceasingly, accumulating in his studio numerous studies in clay or plaster, in which the sensitivity of the modelling vies with the verisimilitude of the gesture.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  By modelling this bold work, Rodin broke away completely from all types of traditional compositions and adopted a form that appealed directly to the imagination. The hand powerfully moulding the matter from which the human being is created represents the divinity bringing forth humanity from emptiness. It is also a symbolic image of the artist inventing a world. Inventions, Inspiration, God, Middle Ages
The Hand of God
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) By modelling this bold work, Rodin broke away completely from all types of traditional compositions and adopted a form that appealed directly to the imagination. The hand powerfully moulding the matter from which the human being is created represents the divinity bringing forth humanity from emptiness. It is also a symbolic image of the artist inventing a world.
"I consider that the body is the only true clothing for the soul, that allows its radiance to shine out." (Rodin to Gsell, 1907)  Auguste Rodin turned himself into its high priest, even though he most often showed love as tormented. The front-facing composition leads one to suppose that this group was perhaps originally designed as part of the Gates of Hell, but The Eternal Spring was finally excluded. Priest, High Priest, Statues
The Eternal Spring
"I consider that the body is the only true clothing for the soul, that allows its radiance to shine out." (Rodin to Gsell, 1907) Auguste Rodin turned himself into its high priest, even though he most often showed love as tormented. The front-facing composition leads one to suppose that this group was perhaps originally designed as part of the Gates of Hell, but The Eternal Spring was finally excluded.
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)  Throughout Rodin's career, the couple was a constant source of inspiration, enabling him to express all nuances of tenderness, passion and sensuality. Along with The Kiss, Fugit Amor, Eternal Spring, Paolo and Francesca, The Eternal Idol is one of the most famous groups inspired by this theme. Idol
The Eternal Idol
Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) Throughout Rodin's career, the couple was a constant source of inspiration, enabling him to express all nuances of tenderness, passion and sensuality. Along with The Kiss, Fugit Amor, Eternal Spring, Paolo and Francesca, The Eternal Idol is one of the most famous groups inspired by this theme.