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Black-and-white colobus male (Colobus angolensis ruwenzori) feeding on invasive Cercostachys vine, Nyungwe national park, Rwanda, July 2007. Photograph: Russell A. Mittermeier/Conservation International

World’s most comprehensive guide to primates - in pictures

Black-and-white colobus male (Colobus angolensis ruwenzori) feeding on invasive Cercostachys vine, Nyungwe national park, Rwanda, July Photograph: Russell A.

This is a Bontebok a member of a species that represents possibly the greatest conservation project ever.  In 1931 84 survivors were moved into Bontebok National Park, in the Western Cape where this image was taken. There are now in excess of 2,000 in a variety of South African National Parks  and private game farms.

"'The Rarest Antelope in Africa.' This is a Bontebok, a mema species that represents possibly the greatest conservation project ever. In 84 survivors were moved into Bontebok National Park, in the Western Cape

Brown bear looking for clams, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska.

Brown bear looking for clams, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Bears like this one mainly eat fish

Spring. 2nd Place, Beautiful Gardens. Picture: Ewa Gryguc, International Garden Photographer of the Year

International Garden Photographer Of The Year 2013 Overall Winner and Wildflower Landscapes Frates: Penstemon Sunrise.

.Just got back from the hairdresser... don't be jealous!  Gran's perm went wrong                                                                                                                                                                                  More

Gorillas in Rwanda: photography by Andy Rouse

Baby mountain gorilla {∞}Preserve os gorilas, lembre-se extinção é prá sempre.

World’s most comprehensive guide to primates - in pictures

World’s most comprehensive guide to primates - in pictures

Emperor tamarin (Saguinus subgrisescens) Photograph: Russell A.

Marbled White Butterfly

A marbled white butterfly. The wettest summer for a century has been blamed for a sharp decline in the number of butterflies in Britain Photograph: Neil Hulme/Butterfly Conservation

Sea Turtle

Nesting green sea turtles return to sea after laying eggs throughout the evening

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