Explore Japanese Yokai, Japanese Art, and more!

Yūrei: ghost.  Pictured is a typical vengeful female spirit wearing white burial robes and head ornament. Summertime is ghost season in Japan!

Yūrei: ghost - Pictured is a typical vengeful female spirit wearing white burial robes & crown. Summertime is ghost season in Japan!

Ameonna- Japanese myth: a woman standing in the rain and licking her hand. She is described as a goddess from China's Mount Wushan, who is a cloud in the morning and rain in the evening. She may be considered a rain-bringer for crops.

Ame-onna are a class of yokai that appear on rainy days and nights. They summon rain wherever they go, and are often blamed for kidnapping and spiriting children away.

Tokyobling's Blog Anamori Inari Shrine – Haneda

Anamori Inari Shrine – Haneda

Konchan, the fox statue outside of Anamori Inari Jinja Station. People take turns dressing her up for the various seasons. Konchan is a Kitsune, or fox spirit.

Yotsuya Kaidan, supposedly the most famous and influential Japanese ghost story of all time

Yotsuya Kaidan, supposedly the most famous and influential Japanese ghost story of all time. Image of Oiwa appearing in a lantern. Images for dissertation project on femininity in Japanese horror cinema, with particular focus on hair.

Today's yokai continues the theme of angry beautiful women. While we looked at the general concept of "hannya" yesterday, today we look at a specific hannya—the most famous one, in fact. Kiyo-hime ...

Today’s yokai continues the theme of angry beautiful women. While we looked at the general concept of “hannya” yesterday, today we look at a specific hannya—the most famous one, i…

JAPAN's_Funa-yūrei: When the ghosts of people who have died at sea transform into vengeful spirits, they become a particular type of ghost called a funa-yūrei.

Funa-yūrei: When the ghosts of people who have died at sea transform into vengeful spirits, they become a particular type of ghost called a funa-yūrei.

Utagawa Toyokuni I (Japanese, 1769–1825)

Onoe Matsusuke as the Ghost of the Murdered Wife Oiwa, in "A Tale of Horror from the Yotsuya Station on the Tokaido Road" Utagawa Toyokuni I (Japanese, Period: Edo period Date: 1812 Culture: Japan Medium: Polychrome woodblock print;

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