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Wovoka, aka Jack Wilson, was a Paiute born in Nevada, in the late 1850s.  In 1889, Wovoka saw visions  that foretold the coming of a messiah who would help the Indians regain  their lost land & bring their dead ancestors back to life. Wovoka  directed his many followers to sing & dance in preparation for the  event.  The ritual, which included elements from the Christian religion,  was called the Ghost Dance.

Wovoka, or "Jack Wilson," Paiute messiah and founder of the Ghost Dance religion. (photo James Mooney, National Park Service / no date)

This photo of Wovoka was taken long after the Ghost Dance.  Holding snake.

This photo of Wovoka was taken long after the Ghost Dance.

Yerington Mondays: Yerington Monday: Wovoka

Wovoka (seated), the Paiute medicine man and mystic whose visions of a world without white men, renewed by the spirits of the dead, inspired the late Ghost Dance movement among western tribes, leading to the Massacre at Wounded Knee.

Baldwin Parker with his wife, Nora Acquitsaketah-Parker, and their three sons - Comanche - no date {Note: Baldwin Parker was the son of Quanah Parker and Chonie.}

Baldwin Parker with his wife, Nora Acquitsaketah-Parker, and their three sons - Comanche - no date {Note: Baldwin Parker was the son of Quanah Parker and Chonie.

Wovoka (aka Wood Cutter, aka Big Rumbling Belly, aka Jack Wilson), the son of Numu-tibo'o (aka Tavibo) and the husband of Mary Wilson, in Mason Valley, Nevada - Northern Paiute - 1916

Wovoka (aka Wood Cutter, aka Big Rumbling Belly, aka Jack Wilson), the son of Numu-tibo'o (aka Tavibo) and the husband of Mary Wilson, in Mason Valley, Nevada - Northern Paiute - 1916

Sarah Winnemucca (1844–1891) was one of the most influential and charismatic Native American women in American history. Born near the Humboldt River Sink in Nevada to a legendary family of Paiute leaders at a time when the Paiutes’ homeland and way of life were increasingly threatened by the influx of Anglo settlers, Sarah later wrote that the white men “came like a lion, yes, like a roaring lion, and have continued so ever since.”

Sarah Winnemucca was one of the most influential and charismatic Native American women in American history. Born near the Humboldt River Sink in Nevada to a legendary family of Paiute.

Paiute Jim and wife - Paiute - 1867

Paiute Jim And Wife - Paiute – 1867

Paiute War-(photo:  Numaga)- The Paiute War also known as the Pyramid Lake War and the Pah Ute War was an armed conflict between Northern Paiutes allied with the Shoshone and the Bannock against the United States. It took place in May 1860 in the vicinity of Pyramid Lake in the Utah Territory, now within present day Nevada.--WIKI

Numaga, peace chief of the Paiutes during the Pyramid Lake Paiute War of 1860

(animated stereo) Revision: Paiute (Nuwuvi) women, circa 1874, via Flickr.

Paiute women, ca 1874

The Arrow Maker and his daughter, Kaivavit Paiutes, in front of their home, northern Arizona. Photographed by Clement Powell, October 4, 1872. American Indian Select List number 83.

Native Americans National Archive The Arrow Maker and his daughter, Kaivavit Paiutes, in front of their home, northern Arizona. Photographed by Clement Powell, October American Indian Select List number 83

Ghost Dance resulted in the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre. The Dance reunites the living with spirits of the dead with peace, prosperity, and unity to native peoples throughout the region. The basis for the Ghost Dance, the circle dance, is a traditional ritual which has been used by many Native Americans since prehistoric times, but this new form was first practiced among the Nevada Paiute in 1889.

A revival of the traditional Ghost Dance performed by Paiute women.

MANY HORSES, daughter of Sitting Bull & Snow On Her, with her son, Hunkpapa (c.1897)

Native America : Many Horses (the daughter of Sitting Bull and Snow On Her), with her son - Hunkpapa - before 1897

Two Paiute children, Mon-su and Su-vu-it, photographed in the vicinity of Saint George by John K. Hillers in the early 1870s. Note the coyote-hid quiver ...

Two Paiute children, Mon-su and Su-vu-it, photographed in the vicinity of Saint George by John K. Hillers in the early Note the coyote-hid quiver with arrows in the foreground.

Yosemite Native Americans - Maggie Taboose Howard and family in Yosemite by Yosemite Native American, via Flickr

Yosemite Native Americans - Maggie Taboose Howard and family - Piaute

Blackfeet (Pikuni) men - no date

Native American Blackfeet (Pikuni) tribe men in front of tipi

Sarah Winnemucca, Paiute writer and lecturer.  Her book Life Among the Piutes (1883) gave an account of their lives.

Sarah Winnemucca Native American rights activist. She gained fame as a translator and negotiator for the U. She traveled extensively and lectured on behalf of her people and later established a school for Native American children in Nevada.

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