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Anatolia: Catal huyuk and Gobekli Tepe - The ancient Black people of Turkey

Ancient world history: Interwoven history of all the world's original civilizations in chronological context and in book format: Anatolia

Prehistoric Cave painting | 35000 years ago | Ancient Art History

The Altamira cave paintings

Prehistoric Cave painting | 35000 years ago | Ancient Art History

Inscription on Lycian tomb. Lycian was an Anatolian language spoken in what is now the Antalya region of Turkey up to about the 3rd Century BC, when the Lycians adopted Greek as their languages. Lycian is thought to have developed from Luwian, a language spoken in Asia Minor before the arrival of the Hittites (c. 18th century BC), and was related to Lydian. Around 180 inscriptions in Lycian dating from the fifth and fourth centuries BC have been found..

Inscription on Lycian tomb. Lycian was an Anatolian language spoken in what is now the Antalya region of Turkey. Lycian is thought to have developed from Luwian, a language closely related to Lydian and Etruscan.

Göbeklitepe- Urfa, 9600 BC (11.600 years ago) (Erdinç Bakla archive)

At Gobekli Tepe, on one of the stone slabs of the building of bench pillar with the lion, there is a carving depicting a naked woman squatting.

Prehistoric rock art in the remote valley of Teimareh in central Iran. The valley is full of ancient petroglyphs, belong to 4500 to 17000 years ago. With over 30,000 engraved images, the valley is one of the world's most important petroglyph sites.  photos: By: @ Babak A. Tafreshi

Prehistoric rock art in the remote valley of Teimareh in central Iran. The valley is full of ancient petroglyphs, belong to 4500 to 17000 years ago. With over engraved images, the valley is one of the world's most important petroglyph sites.

Çatalhöyük,Tapınak VII.8 duvar resmi,James Mellaart (Erdinç Bakla archive)

Çatalhöyük,Tapınak VII.8 duvar resmi,James Mellaart (Erdinç Bakla archive)

Top row: Çatalhöyük after the first excavations by James Mellaart and his team (photo: Omar hoftun, CC: BY-SA 3.0) Bottom row: Bull bucrania, corner installation in Building 77, Çatalhöyük (photo: Çatalhöyük, CC: BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Çatalhöyük or Çatal Höyük (pronounced “cha-tal hay OOK”) is not the oldest site of the Neolithic era or the largest, but it is extremely important to the beginning of art.

[Deer hunt, detail of a wall painting from level lll, Catal Hoyuk, Turkey, ca. 8000 BCE.  This Neolithic painter depicted human figures as a composite of frontal and profile views, the most descriptive picture of the shape of the human body. this format would become the rule of milennia.

Mural paintings from Catal Höyük, Turkey (southeast of the modern city of Konya.

Huellas de manos en la cueva de El Castillo, Puente Viesgo (Cantabria)

Spanish cave paintings shown as oldest in world

El Castillo Cave, Cantabria, Spain - the smudged, red disk below the hand stencils is the oldest cave art yet dated at years old and might have been created by Neanderthals. by Pedro Saura

A hill in the northeast Argentina that holds cave paintings, which was considered to be a sacred place before the Incan conquest of the region in the 15th c. has been identified. Cerro Kawsay (Hill of Life, in the Quechua language) seems to have been a sacred place since between 900-1000 A.D, although it could be from the Formative period (500 A.D). Of the 329 chiseled or carved figures, 267 are zoomorphic and most are representations of llamas, linked to the origin myths of the Inca people.

The discovery of this image is part of a much wider project destined to the excavation and restoration of the Incan site known as Potrero de Payogasta, in the wide and contrasting Valle Calchaquí, in Argentina

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