Imao Keinen. Japanese Chestnut, Flycatcher. Color woodblock, 1891. Oban

Imao Keinen. Japanese Chestnut, Flycatcher. Color woodblock, 1891. Oban

Pepsi Mont Blanc - based on a French chestnut dessert

19 Pepsi Flavors You've Probably Never Heard Of

Pepsi Mont Blanc : Pepsi à saveur de crème de marron, vendu au Japon en hiver

Japanese teahouse is actually a chestnut tree house. This is by Japanese architect Terunobu Fujimori.

Japanese teahouse is actually a chestnut tree house. This is by Japanese architect Terunobu Fujimori.

Sea Cucumber and Chestnut: Edible Treasures - Ōhara Mitsuhiro (Japan, 1810-1875). Japan, mid-19th century - Ebony, stained boxwood, ivory with sumi | LACMA Collections

Sea Cucumber and Chestnut: Edible Treasures - Ōhara Mitsuhiro (Japan, 1810-1875). Japan, mid-19th century - Ebony, stained boxwood, ivory with sumi | LACMA Collections

Many cultures enjoy chestnuts as a valued source of nutrition. Chestnuts have been harvested for centuries in Japan, China, Korea, Europe and the Mediterranean. Greeks put chestnuts above almonds, walnuts and hazelnuts in terms of quality. So, why don’t we eat more chestnuts here in North America?

Oven Roasted Chestnuts (and my favorite way to enjoy them

Many cultures enjoy chestnuts as a valued source of nutrition. Chestnuts have been harvested for centuries in Japan, China, Korea, Europe and the Mediterranean. Greeks put chestnuts above almonds, walnuts and hazelnuts in terms of quality. So, why don’t we eat more chestnuts here in North America?

Japanese early 20th century bronze chestnut box with wasp

Japanese early 20th century bronze chestnut box with wasp

chestnuts wagashi

chestnuts wagashi

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